Led Zeppelin – Hey Hey What Can I Do?

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Led Zeppelin were an English rock band formed in London in 1968. The group consisted of guitarist Jimmy Page, singer Robert Plant, bassist and keyboardist John Paul Jones, and drummer John Bonham. The band’s heavy, guitar-driven sound, rooted in blues and psychedelia on their early albums, has earned them recognition as one of the progenitors of heavy metal, though their unique style drew from a wide variety of influences, including folk music.

After changing their name from the New Yardbirds, Led Zeppelin signed a deal with Atlantic Records that afforded them considerable artistic freedom. Although the group was initially unpopular with critics, they achieved significant commercial success with albums such as Led Zeppelin (1969), Led Zeppelin II (1969), Led Zeppelin III (1970), Led Zeppelin IV (1971), Houses of the Holy (1973), and Physical Graffiti (1975).

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Led Zeppelin – Hey Hey What Can I Do?

Page wrote most of Led Zeppelin’s music, particularly early in their career, while Plant generally supplied the lyrics. Jones’ keyboard-based compositions later became central to the group’s catalogue, which featured increasing experimentation.

From: You Tube

“Hey, Hey, What Can I Do” is a song by the English rock group Led Zeppelin, released in 1970 as the B-side of “Immigrant Song” outside the United Kingdom. It is the only non-album track the band released before their 1980 breakup, appearing on the Atlantic Records UK various artists LP, The New Age of Atlantic, released in 1972. The song was first released on CD in September 1990 on the 4-CD Led Zeppelin Boxed Set collection.

Initial 7″ single pressings of the song featured a slightly longer, gradual fade that ends abruptly when the tape is turned off. Subsequent pressings had a quicker fade, presumably to avoid the sudden end. This is the version that has been featured on every CD release prior to 2015. The 2015 expanded edition of Coda features an even shorter fade, excising the acoustic guitar fadeout altogether. It is possible that the master tape for the song has been lost or damaged, and that every CD release has been mastered from a clean vinyl re-pressing of the 45.

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 From: Wikipedia

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