George Harrison – Give Me Love

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George Harrison, MBE (25 February 1943 – 29 November 2001) was an English guitarist, singer, songwriter and film producer who achieved international fame as the lead guitarist of the Beatles. Often referred to as “the quiet Beatle”, Harrison embraced Indian mysticism and helped broaden the horizons of his fellow Beatles as well as their Western audience by incorporating Indian instrumentation in their music.

Although the majority of the Beatles’ songs were written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, most Beatles albums from 1965 onwards contained at least two Harrison compositions. His songs for the group included “Taxman”, “Within You Without You”, “While My Guitar Gently Weeps”, “Here Comes the Sun” and “Something”, the last of which became the Beatles’ second-most covered song.

 

 

George Harrison – Give Me Love

Harrison’s earliest musical influences included George Formby and Django Reinhardt; Carl Perkins, Chet Atkins, Chuck Berry and Ry Cooder were significant later influences. By 1965 he had begun to lead the Beatles into folk rock through his interest in the Byrds and Bob Dylan, and towards Indian classical music through his use of the sitar on “Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)”. He developed an interest in the Hare Krishna movement and became an admirer of Indian culture and mysticism.

 

From: You Tube

Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth) is a song by English musician George Harrison, released as the opening track of his 1973 album Living in the Material World. It was also issued as the album’s lead single, in May that year, and became Harrison’s second US number 1, after “My Sweet Lord”. In doing so, the song demoted Paul McCartney and Wings’ “My Love” from the top of the Billboard Hot 100, marking the only occasion that two former Beatles have held the top two chart positions in America.

“Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth)” is one of its author’s most popular songs, among fans and music critics, and features a series of much-praised slide-guitar solos from Harrison. The recording signalled a deliberate departure from his earlier post-Beatles work, in the scaling down of the big sound synonymous with All Things Must Pass and his other co-productions with Phil Spector over 1970–71.

Everybody that Loves George Harrison Loves Classic Rock

Everybody Loves Classic Rock

From: Wikipedia

 

 

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